Should You Eat A Big Dinner The Night Before A Marathon?

This is a question everyone asks when they start long-distance running competitions, and it’s a question everyone must answer for themselves. There is no simple single answer scenario that will solve everyone’s problems the same way. All of our bodies work differently, and no two people are alike. What one person eats and digests might affect that person’s body in completely different ways than another person, and so a little experimentation might be in order. That said, what should you generally eat before a marathon?

First of all, if you decide to eat a big dinner the night before a marathon, make sure you know and like what you’re eating. This is not the time to try something new. If you do, then this is when a new allergy will develop or a serious bout of gastrointestinal distress will strike with a cold vengeance the likes of which you’ve never known. Don’t take the chance.

The key to a good race is often keeping your digestive processes consistent and constant. In other words, it’s often better to eat a lot of little foods more often than it is to eat three or four bigger meals the day before. That way your body can get used to digesting important nutrients and calories over a period of time instead of at a single moment’s notice. Don’t consume any red meat–that takes forever to digest and you’ll pay the price later. Fish or chicken are good choices, as are small portions of fruit and veggies or energy bars.

Although some athletes load up on carbs the night before, this tactic isn’t right for everyone. Pasta and other grainy foods tend to make their way through your digestive tract slowly, and depending on the person they can lead to gas and bloating for a long while the day after you eat them. If you know your body can handle the carbs, then go for it. If you don’t know, then you should. Until you do, avoid them like the plague.

Cut down on the fatty foods, dairy products if they give you trouble, and avoid roughage (potatoes and rice and fiber, etc.). You don’t want to be midway through a race and start to feel a bowel movement coming on. Remember: exercise helps your digestion, and you’ll be getting a lot of exercises all at once. Your intestines won’t need any more help than they already have.

A few hours before the marathon, try to eat a small breakfast. Don’t eat too much. Eating too much food too soon before the beginning of the race can lead to cramps, gas, bloating and other stomach injuries. Don’t hydrate all in one go, either. Drink water at regular intervals the day before and the day of, and when the race starts don’t wait until you’re thirsty or hungry to replenish what you’ve lost. If you’re running a marathon or more, then start adding calories before mile five or so and you should be good to keep going at a proper pace for much more. Good luck!

What Is The Difference Between Cross-Trainer and Running Sneakers?

When you exercise, it’s extremely important to choose the right kind of footwear for the activities you’re doing at the time, especially if you engage in those activities on a routine basis. If you don’t wear the right pair of shoes, then you could hurt your feet and make it more difficult or impossible to exercise in the future. Save yourself medical expenses in the future by investing in the right footwear now. So what is the difference between cross-trainers and running sneakers? It basically depends on the kind of motion for the activity.

You’ll want to wear running sneakers if, you guessed it, you run. If you walk, you might think you’d be better off with ordinary sneakers, but you’re still better served by a good pair of running shoes. These generally take a lot longer to come apart even though they’re taking a lot more of a beating, and they’re manufactured with a variety of types of feet in mind.

Cross-trainers, on the other hand, are created for use alongside a number of other activities that involve some sort of side-to-side movement. Use them when you’re involved in other strenuous activities like lifting weights, boxing, yoga, stretching, etc. You’ll be alright in cross-trainers or if you take on basketball or another sport. If you’re on the pavement, though, then make sure you’ve got a good pair of running shoes to wear instead. If you do too much running in cross-trainers, you can still incur a number of serious injuries not only to your feet but also to your neck and back. In other words, if you’re really hardcore about the sports you’re playing–and you play them often–you’ll want running shoes.

Running shoes are a little bit on the lighter side. Even though the difference between the types of shoes in weight isn’t very big, it will still have a huge impact on the potential consequences for your body once you use them for a while. Cross-trainers are heavier in order to support side-to-side movements in those gym-related activities.

If you’re not sure that you’ve got your eyes on the right pair of shoes, then there are a couple differences in the way they look that you might be able to spot. Cross-trainers have wider soles than running shoes, while running shoes have smoother tread because they don’t require as much traction with forward movement.

Although it might not seem like the differences matter very much, they just might. It depends on how much exercise you do, and what kind. If you’re not sure that you’ve got the right pair of shoes for you, then ask for the advice of other people involved in the same activities, or find a customer service rep at the store where you shop for your footwear.

How To Make A Killer Running Playlist

There is no tried and true method of creating the best running playlist possible. A lot of it depends on the person. What kind of music do you like? How rigid or loose are you? Where are you running? If you’re taking a stroll outside in the Antarctic tundra during a blizzard, then you might be in the mood for something a little bit different than if you’re jogging in Death Valley during a season high. To each his own, but here are the best bits of advice we’ve accumulated over the years.

First of all, don’t go without. Exercise is a great way to augment your mood (among other more fun activities that need not be discussed here), and a great way to complement the benefits of exercise happens through music. Because you’re less focused on the exercise itself, the stress of that exercise is reduced as your attention is split.

The science is sort of iffy when it comes to whether or not you should choose music that synchronizes beats per minute with your running pace. If this sounds like something you think might help you, then first calculate your running pace by counting steps per minute. Do it on more than one occasion to ensure accuracy. Whatever number you get, that’s equivalent to the beats per minute of the songs you’ll want to add to your playlist. If this approach doesn’t get your mojo flowing, then that’s no problem. We still recommend you stay away from “Thousand” which holds the record for highest beats per minute, or any songs that you can only hear once every five seconds because they’re so slow. Be smart about what you choose.

You might opt to stay away from heavy metal. It might energize you, but it’s not exactly inspirational. Find something that puts you in a good mood, and stay away from sad songs that leave you feeling down in the dumps.

Like all playlists, it should tell a story–an exercise story. How do you run? Do you start slow and work yourself up to a decent pace? Do you sprint until you’re half-dead? Do you engage in a cool-down period toward the end of your workout? Take these questions into consideration when deciding what’s best for you. If you start slow, then the first songs you hear should be on the slow side too. If you end with a sprint, then the fastest songs should be at the end of the list. This is also a good way to plan exactly how long you want your runs to last. You do not want to be in a slip and fall accident in NY.

At the end of the day, a big part of your running playlist needs to be based off of what you like to listen to the most, even if it’s a little too slow or a little too fast for someone else. Maybe you prefer the absurdity of System Of A Down or the Celine Dion love song in Titanic or a grandiose boss battle theme in your favorite video game. Whatever floats your boat, that’s what you should do. What works for us might not work for you. What’s important is that you try new things until you do find what works, and then carry on running at a comfortable pace!

Bad Marathon Advice: Why You Should Ignore Everyone You Know

Our friends and relatives all have one magical thing in common. They’re fountains of perpetual knowledge, and they know better than common sense or a quick Internet search could ever prove otherwise. If you’re a health nut (and we mean that in the nicest way possible since we are too), then you probably share some of your exercise regimens or healthy habits with the people you know. That’s okay. But it probably means they’ve told you what they think you should do instead. These are the worst pieces of marathon advice you’ve probably already heard, will probably hear again, and why they’re all terribly wrong.

Some idiot probably thinks you’re a prince or princess and that you need to look your best for that race you’re about to run–so naturally the idiot either provided an upgraded outfit or told you where you can find one that looks oh-so-good. Ignore this mysterious individual. Your fifteenth mile into a race isn’t the ideal time to realize that your crotch seam is slowly turning into the Grand Canyon during a flash flood event. Do what you normally do, whether it’s the clothes you wear or the food you eat. Change nothing.

Taking that one step further, don’t think for a second that this is a good time to upgrade your running shoes. Anyone who’s worth their salt on the track knows that a decent worn-in pair (we’re not talking duct-taped soles with no shoe laces) is better than a brand new pair. Then again, most toddlers know that. Why don’t your friends know that? Blisters hurt. Avoid them.

For some reason there are some very special people out there who like to “bank miles” during a marathon, i.e. start fast because you’ll tire later. It’s a freaking marathon, NOT a sprint. It’s one of the most used proverbs out there, and just maybe there’s a reason it exists in the first place. Most people who know what they’re doing start slow and gradually increase to their expected pace long-term. The best among us start at the same pace they finish with, but that’s no easy feat.

If you’re a beer drinker, then by all means enjoy a frosty tall boy at the end of the race–but don’t overdo it. There is research out there that suggests beer reduces the inflammation that arises from prolonged runs, but it uses non-alcoholic beer. If someone tells you that beer is going to make you feel better after the race, then that person probably just wants to laugh at you while you vomit in a grimy restroom.

One oft-mentioned tidbit of bad advice involves when you should start to eat or drink. Our bodies lose energy at a staggering rate during a marathon run, and if you wait until you’re hungry or thirsty to replenish the nutrients and electrolytes you need to finish the race, then your body won’t absorb them in time to do any good. Start refueling about a quarter of the way into the race and you should do fine.

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Tips For Starting Marathon Training

One question many people ask when they think about running a marathon is, “where do I start?” That is a very complicated question. Everyone starts somewhere different in their marathon journey, so it is important to be honest with yourself to see where your needs lie in the preparation for your big day. Here are a few tips that we think can help you greatly with starting marathon training and prevent you from needing to hire a personal injury law firm after the race.

1) Start Small

Starting small is a very important concept when it comes to training for a marathon. People often get a grandiose idea of running a marathon for the first time, but they are not ready to put in months of hard work to do it. Starting small is absolutely essential, as it can help you compartmentalize all of the things you need to do to get ready. By not biting off more than you can chew in the beginning, you set yourself up for success when you need to start doing something more challenging.

2) Have Fun

The most important thing about this is that you need to have fun while you’re doing it. If you’re not having fun while you’re training, why even bother? Training for a marathon can be a very scary thing, so putting in some fun exercises and drills can make the entire process much easier on you. In addition, it is a well-known concept that when you’re having fun, time seems to go by quicker. If you sprinkle in some fun activities, your workouts will feel shorter, which will help you continue to grow as a runner!

I hope that these tips will help you get started with your dream marathon training regimen. If you have any questions about where to start, please let us know, we would love to talk about getting you ready for the big day!

When it comes to training for a marathon, please don’t take Barney Stinson’s advice!

Things To Avoid When Running A Marathon

There are a variety of things that you need to avoid when you decide to train for and run in a marathon. These things can vary all the way from how healthy you stay in your run, to how tired you get, to preventing horrible catastrophes like wrongful death.

1) Eating Too Much Beforehand

It is very important that you eat something before your marathon, as we have touched upon in an earlier article. While this is true, it is important to do so in moderation. If you eat too much food, you might not only be slowed down, but you can put yourself in serious physical harm. Foods with high amounts of sodium, or with a lot of spice, can make you sweat a lot and cause you to lose valuable nutrients in your body. Even “healthy” snacks like protein bars can fill you up too much and give your body the wrong kind of energy.

2) Having a Running Partner

It is important to have a running partner when you are training, but when it comes to the real thing, you need to do it by yourself. Having a runner partner is good in theory, but in practice it means that both runners are always doing something to accomodate the other runner. For example, if one is naturally faster, the slower runner might tear a muscle trying to keep up. It is important to know your limits as a runner, but having a partner can throw that completely out of whack. You will be surrounded by other runners, so you should never have a lack of motivation when you are in a marathon.

I hope that this article illuminated some of the things you should avoid while running a marathon. At the end of the day, you need to trust your body and do what you feel is right. Don’t take this as gospel.

For more information, please check out the following video:

Three Foods You Should Never Eat Before A Run

Let us first salute you for getting out and doing your body good. Whether rain or sun, you have been trying to run a=on a daily basis to burn off those calories from the times you have indulged. You are trying to eat healthier, but did you know some of the foods you are eating for your health are the worst for your exercise routine. Below are three of the worst foods you can eat before an invigorating run.

Leafy Greens

There is no question about the health benefits of leafy greens. In fact, they are on just about every list for healthy eating. However, raw greens like kale and spinach tend to cause serious discomfort to runners. This is due to the high fiber content contained in these vegetables. If you are looking to run but would prefer not to have the gas and bloating that will come from these vegetables, you may want to consider a green smoothie. You will get similar health benefits minus the discomfort and embarrassment.

Spicy Foods

Unless you happen to have a stone stomach, you more than likely experience some heartburn after a spicy meal. While there is nothing wrong with indulging in a feast, these types of foods take an extra long digestion time, which you will want to plan for your run. Because there is nothing worse than heartburn during a run!

Protein Bars

How many people do you see at the trail grabbing a cool water and protein bar before they start off on their run? More than likely a good number and that is due to the marketing that has made protein bars into a healthy food. These bars typically contain more sugar than protein and are simply going to cancel out your run.

Famous Male Marathon Runners

Many marathon runners don’t get the appreciation they deserve. To win a marathon, you need more than speed and an immigration attorney; you also need endurance. These famous male marathon runners are spectacular athletes, and their accomplishments should be celebrated.

Wilson Kipsang Kiprotich

Kenyan runner Wilson Kipsang Kiprotich has won an astounding number of marathons. Between 2010 and 2014, he managed to win 11 races in a row. He has broken world records and earned a number of medals.

Dieter Baumann

Dieter Baumann is one of the finest runners to come out of Germany. He managed to win the 5000 m race at the 1992 Olympics, even though the competition was incredibly fierce. Baumann’s wife helped to coach him as he trained for his big win.

Viktor Röthlin

Viktor Röthlin is a Swiss runner that has won a number of Olympic medals. He is known for his amazing endurance. He doesn’t seem to tire out like other runners do during marathons; he can keep on running for as long as he has to.

Abebe Bikila

The late Abebe Bikila is a runner that still inspires people today. This Ethiopian runner is a two-time Olympic Marathon champion. While many of his records have been broken, his accomplishments are still very impressive.

Stylianos Kyriakides

Greek runner Stylianos Kyriakides is known for his speed and endurance, but he is also known for his charity work. The late runner used his talents to raise money for needy children.

Haile Gebrselassie

Ethiopian runner Haile Gebrselassie is a legend in the marathon world. Over the course of his running career, he shattered a number of records. Today, he serves as the President of the Ethiopian Athletics Federation. He is working to train a new generation of athletes.

Marathon runners are incredibly talented. These famous male marathon runners worked hard for their accomplishments. If you’re preparing for a marathon, you may want to look at how these men trained.

For more information on male runners, check out the following video:

What You Need To Know About The 100 Marathon Club

If you love to run and have completed at least 100 marathons, you are eligible to join the 100 Marathon Club. The club promotes many different events in the UK and Ireland, including running challenges and advice. The club can help you enter a race as an individual or as a group.

The 100 Marathon Club is a place where people can share knowledge and help people who are new to the organization get the encouragement they need. You can join at the full or associate level. Full members have completed 100 marathons, while associate members only need to have completed 50 marathons.

Associate members can’t wear the official club kit but as soon as they complete 100 marathons they can. The club puts on many races and one of the most popular is the annual Challenge Competition. Many famous runners are members of the club and they are active on social media.

You can find out about many different marathons through the club and even promote one of your own. If you love to run, you will find friendship and plenty of running opportunities through the club and continue to grow your love of running. Running marathons is addictive and it is great to have a place where you can enjoy being with fellow runners and continue to improve your running skills while finding new and interesting marathons to take part in.

The 100 Marathon Club is worth joining if you meet the requirements. You will enjoy the company of fellow experienced runners and continue your love of running with people who are dedicated and enjoy running marathons. Being able to join the 100 Marathon Club is also a huge achievement as there are very few people who have managed to run so many marathons.

Famous Marathon Runners That Were Female

Not all successful marathon runners are men. Here are some famous marathon runners who were female.

Bobbi Gibb

Bobbi Gibb is famous for being the first woman to run the Boston marathon. However, running the marathon isn’t her only accomplishment. She actually managed to win the marathon a whopping three times!

Olga Appell

Mexican-native Olga Appell is well-known in the Twin Cities area. She has won the Twin Cities Marathon twice! She was also the winner of the woman’s marathon at the 1991 Pan-Am Games.

Amy Hastings

Amy Hastings isn’t an ordinary marathon runner; she is an Olympian athlete! She is considered to be the ninth-fastest American marathon runner of all time.

Maria Trujillo

Maria Trujillo is a championship marathon runner. She placed in the 1991 IAAF World Championships. She gave a number of athletes a run for their money.

Marla Runyan

Marla Runyan was the first legally blind runner to run in an Olympic marathon. While that is a major accomplishment on its own, she was also the winner of the U.S. Marathon Championships in 2006.

Jenny Spangler

Jenny Spangler’s running career took many people by surprise. She came out of nowhere to win the U.S. Olympic Trials Marathon. She continued to run and win for many years after that.

Linda Somers Smith

Linda Somers Smith hasn’t just run in an Olympic marathon once. She is a seven-time U.S. Olympic Trials Marathon runner.

Kara Goucher

The New York City Marathon is incredibly competitive. That’s why so many people were surprised when Kara Goucher took third place in the 2008 marathon. She is an Olympic medalist and an incredibly talented runner.

Many women have successfully completed marathons. A lot of these women have even set records, though many suffered from personal injury and loss during their careers. Now that you know more about famous marathon runners who were female, you can use these women as a source of inspiration.